Dandelion “Honey”

picture1166

Everyone on my Christmas list is getting a jar this December… this recipe is that fabulous.  Before we get to the recipe, I should explain a few things.  First, I am a big believer in letting my lawn grow au naturel.  Rain from the sky and an occasional mow pretty much sum up my approach to lawn care, to the chagrin of a few of my neighbors.  This means, of course, that I am blessed with a brilliant display of yellow dandelions this time a year.  Weeds, did you say?  No Way!

Dandelions were imported into the US hundreds of years ago as a nutritious food source.  Dandelions are wildly good for you, rivaling carrots and spinach in their Vitamin A, Vitamin B12, Vitamin C, Calcium, Iron, and Phosphorus.  The entire plant is edible, but today we are focusing on the pretty yellow flower heads.  A quick web search will reveal how dandelion flowers are valued for their antioxidants, their diuretic and antibacterial properties, and their use by herbalists in treating everything from headaches and depression to stomach and menstrual cramps.  Dandelions aren’t weeds… they’re nature’s own grocery store and pharmacy!

Today we are making dandelion “honey.”  The taste is spot-on identical to wild honey, without the hefty price tag.  At about 50 cents a pint (for the sugar and pectin), this “honey” is a real bargain.  It’s vegan, has practically the same glycemic index as honey, and contains pollen (which is where many of the purported health benefits of bee honey originate).  Make sure you pick dandelions from an unsprayed location!  Allow yourself about an hour in the sunshine to harvest enough flower heads for this recipe.

picture1152Ingredients (makes 9 half-pint jars)

8 cups dandelion flower heads (cut just above the base of the flower head, to get all of the yellow and almost none of the green)

8 cups boiling water

6 cups white sugar

Juice from 1/2 large lemon OR Juice from 1 whole, large orange

4 tablespoons pectin powder

picture1154Directions

Step 1) Cover dandelion flower heads with boiling water.  Cover and set aside for at least three hours or overnight.

Step 2) Carefully pour the mixture through a fine mesh sieve, saving the “tea” and discarding the flower petals.

Step 3) Bring 6 cups of dandelion tea to a boil in a large pot (if you have more than 6 cups of tea, you can freeze the excess).

Step 4) Stir pectin into sugar (the pectin will dissolve more readily this way).  Add pectin/sugar mixture all at once to pot of boiling tea.  Add lemon juice or orange juice as well.

picture1155Step 5) Stir thoroughly until sugar is completely dissolved.

Step 6) Bring mixture to a full rolling boil.  Boil for 3 minutes with stirring, then turn off heat.

Step 7) Follow canning instructions to preserve your dandelion “honey.”  Leave 1/2 inch headspace, and process jars in boiling water bath for 10 minutes.

Enjoy!

Cookbook Freebie Contest

Crowded Earth Kitchen Loves Freebies!

cookbook-cover-imageThe Global Recipe Project Cookbook

Contest Ends November 30th – THREE winners will be drawn!

Three ways to enter:
1) Reblog this post!
2) Tweet a link to this post, and include @CrowdedEarthKit
3) Share elsewhere and post a link in the comments
———
Available on Amazon, 100% of the profits from The Global Recipe Project Cookbook will benefit not-for-profit organizations which feed people as a central part of their mission. Cooks and food bloggers from around the world have contributed to this amazing book. Over 170 recipes from 65 countries are included. Pick up a copy today, and support a worthy cause!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACheck out a few sample recipes from this cookbook:
Belgian Chocolate Hazelnut Spread
Chadian Chicken and Okra
Dutch Windmill Cookies
French Soupe à l’oignon
German Beef Rouladen
Swiss Fondue
8″ x 10″ (20.32 x 25.4 cm) 
Black & White Bleed on Cream paper
136 pages
CEK Publishing
ISBN-13: 978-0998191607
ISBN-10: 0998191604
BISAC: Cooking / Regional & Ethnic / General

Chickpea Stew

S1Today’s recipe is an autumn favorite here at Crowded Earth Kitchen. Simple and hearty, Chickpea Stew combines everyday ingredients to capture flavors reminiscent of West African dishes. Chickpea Stew may be served over rice, couscous, or simply enjoyed on its own!  Continue reading

Pumpkin Pudding

Pudding1Pumpkin is one of the healthiest veggies around! It’s low in calories but chock full of fiber and vitamins. This quick and easy recipe allows you to serve up veggies as a delicious (and healthy) dessert! Your secret is safe with me. Continue reading

Penne with Glazed Vegetables

P1Between the garden harvest and the back-to-school commotion around here, dinners in September need to be fuss-free. Penne with Glazed Vegetables is easily prepared around busy schedules, yet still captures the best of the season’s fresh vegetable flavor. Let’s get started! Continue reading

Peanut Pumpkin Soup

Soup1Rich and earthy, warm and savory, this is a perfect soup for a crisp autumn evening. You can use canned pumpkin to make a pot of Peanut Pumpkin Soup quickly, or roast a pie pumpkin and puree the flesh for added depth of flavor. It’s entirely up to you. Let’s get started! Continue reading